Press Releases

GMRT discovers several rare class of radio stars

A group of astronomers led by astronomers at NCRA, Pune, has discovered eight stars belonging to a rare class of stars called ‘MRPs’, or, Main-sequence Radio Pulse emitters, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), located near Pune.

The uGMRT confirms an unexpected event in millisecond pulsars - the cosmic clocks.

A group of nearly 40 astronomers, under the banner of Indian Pulsar Timing Array (InPTA), have provided first time a clear evidence of unexpected changes in a milli-second radio pulsar using the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT). Millisecond pulsars are exotic objects in the sky and are used in efforts for detecting ultra-low frequency gravitational waves due to their extreme stable behaviour. These changes have attracted the attention of astronomers across the globe because the millisecond pulsars are not expected to show such behaviour and this star-clock may not be good enough to search for gravitational waves.

Discovery of a Remnant Radio Galaxy Using the GMRT

Dr. Dharam Vir Lal, a scientist working at the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (NCRA-TIFR), Pune, India has discovered a remnant radio galaxy at the peripheral region of a cluster of galaxies named Abell2065, using the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT) and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The research has been published in the 16th July 2021 issue of the Astrophysical Journal.

uGMRT uncovers the signature of a cannon ball fired from the Sun, using pulsars!

A group of nearly 20 astronomers, under the banner of Indian Pulsar Timing Array (InPTA), have for the first time detected the effect of a Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) from the Sun in the signal from a millisecond pulsar using the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT). This space weather effect on a pulsar from the Sun is the first of its kind ever reported. This was possible only due to unique wideband and low frequency capabilities of the uGMRT.

CHIME telescope detects more than 500 mysterious fast radio bursts in its first year of operation

Scientists with the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) Collaboration, including researchers at the Tata Institute for Fundamental Research (TIFR) and the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), have assembled the largest collection of fast radio bursts (FRBs) in the telescope’s first FRB catalog, which they will present this week at the American Astronomical Society Meeting.

GMRT measures the atomic hydrogen gas mass in galaxies 9 billion years ago

A team of astronomers from the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA-TIFR) in Pune, and the Raman Research Institute (RRI), in Bangalore, has used the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to measure the atomic hydrogen gas content of galaxies 9 billion years ago, in the young universe. This is the earliest epoch in the universe for which there is a measurement of the atomic hydrogen content of galaxies. The new result is a crucial confirmation of the group’s earlier result, where they had measured the atomic hydrogen content of galaxies 8 billion years ago, and pushes our understanding of galaxies to even earlier in the universe. The new research has been published in the 2 June 2021 issue of The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

uGMRT reveals for the first time the patchy environment of a rare cosmic explosion

Scientists from the National Centre for radio Astrophysics of the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (NCRA-TIFR) Pune used the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT) to determine that AT 2018 cow, the first of a newly discovered class of cosmic explosions, has an extremely patchy environment. http://www.ncra.tifr.res.in/ncra/outreach/press-releases/press-note-english-at2018cow.pdf

India joins the global hunt for Gravitational Waves (GW) from monster black holes

A consortium of mainly Indian researchers under the banner “Indian Pulsar Timing Array (InPTA)”, became a full member of the “International Pulsar Timing Array (IPTA)” , an international effort to discover and study very low-frequency gravitational waves from supermassive binary black holes orbiting each other. InPTA regularly employs the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (uGMRT), situated near Pune to monitor pulsars to obtain high precision timing measurements. The unique frequency range of the uGMRT, 300 - 800 MHz is not covered by other big telescopes used by IPTA, therefore the inclusion of uGMRT is crucial in improving the precision of IPTA to detect nano-hertz GWs.

GMRT accorded prestigious IEEE Milestone status

The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) has achieved yet another honour and major landmark : it has been selected as a IEEE Milestone facility. The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is the world's largest technical professional organization dedicated to advancing technology in all areas related to electrical and electronics engineering.

प्रतिष्ठित आयईईई माइलस्टोन म्हनूण जी एम आर टी स मान्यता

जायंट मीटरवेव्ह रेडिओ टेडिस्कोपने (जीएमआरटी) ने आणखी एक सन्मान आणी प्रमुख ऐतिहासिक कामगिरी केली आहे. आयईईई माइलस्टोन मान्यतेसाठी जीएमआरटी ची निवड करण्यात आली आहे.

Upgraded GMRT measures the atomic hydrogen mass in distant galaxies.

A team of astronomers from the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA-TIFR) in Pune, and the Raman Research Institute (RRI), in Bangalore, has used the upgraded Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) to measure the atomic hydrogen content of galaxies seen as they were 8 billion years ago, when the universe was young. This is the earliest epoch in the universe for which there is a measurement of the atomic gas content of galaxies.

Indian scientists discover long sought tiny explosions on the Sun

A group of scientists working at the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), Pune have recently discovered tiny flashes of radio light from all over the Sun. They have identified the smoking guns for these small magnetic explosions and hence the first ever evidence for their existence in explaining the long pending coronal heating problem. June 2020

GMRT discovers a gigantic ring of hydrogen gas around a distant galaxy

A team of astronomers at the National Centre for Radio Astrophysics (NCRA), Pune have discovered a mysterious ring of hydrogen gas around a distant galaxy, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT). The ring is much bigger than the galaxy it surrounds, and has diameter about 4 times that of our Milky Way. - January 2020

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